A Look at Federation Guard Buckles and the White Belt Ceremonial

Hello All,

As part of progress on the preparation of Volume 3, in our series of reference books titled: Metal Uniform Embellishment of the Australian Army, post 1953 (the ‘QEII’ era), this  post shows a preview of the documented coverage of the buckle and white belt ceremonial fittings used by the Australian Federation Guard, when performing various parade duties.

Federation_Guard_performs_at_the_opening_ceremony_for_Talisman_Sabre_2011
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth R. Hendrix

The above image of Federation Guard members was taken at the opening of Exercise Talisman Sabre, in Rockhampton 2011. As can be seen from above image, Army, Navy and Air Force personnel each wear a different variant of the ADF approved buckle on the white belt ceremonial.

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The following images, set out some of the fittings and fixtures used to complete the white belt ceremonial, as part of Parade Orders of Dress for the Federation Guard.

We trust that these images will be of interest to many… especially to family and friends of ADF personnel who are engaged in researching photographs and video footage of the uniforms worn by those they know and love.

Yours in research and collecting

The Authors

“Metal Uniform Embellishments of the Australian Army”
Post 1953 (the ‘QEII’ era) Volumes 1 and 2
__________________
To quote an old friend:
“If you are able to read this, thank a teacher.
If you are able to read this in English, thank a soldier.”

Published by:

charliebravo00c

I am the "C" component of the "CB" numbering system used in our book called: Metal Uniform Embellishments of the Australian Army, Post 1953 ('QEII Series') Vol 1 (Insignia for Corps and Schools etc). Yep... that's a mouthful and the 614 page eBook is an eyeful to match... with images of the front and back of each item, as well as weights and measures for each, so that badge variants can be reliably distinguished by collectors, dealers, historians, re-enactor groups and enthusiasts anywhere in the world.

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